He has been featured in more than four dozen museums and public venues around the world.  From New York to China, and Ottawa to the Netherlands, wherever his works appear, Luke Jerram inspires.

Today his "Floating Earth" debuts in Wigan, England.  It will appear hover over the Pennington Flash Lake in England from November 19-29, 2021.

In 2019 he became a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, in 2020 he was awarded a Honorary Doctorate from the University of Bristol, and won numerous awards.

According to his website:

“Luke Jerram’s multidisciplinary arts practice involves the creation of sculptures, installations and live artworks.  Living in the UK, but working international, Jerram creates art projects which excite and inspire people around the world.”

But his art is not merely inspiring, it is awesomely beautiful.  And Jerram has a clear sense of community, and a definite “in this together” spirit that has reached new artistic heights during COVID.

Recently he completed – with the help of people in the local community – a quilt bridge covering for the Eisteddfod in Llangollen.  The work is called “Bridges not Walls.”

“In Memoriam” is a temporary arrangement of white and red flags in the shape of a red cross “made in tribute,” according to LukeJerram.com, “to all the NHS health and care workers who have been risking their lives during the crisis.”

POOLE, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 27: Luke Jerram's 'In Memoriam' artwork installation on Sandbanks beach on September 27, 2020 in Poole, England. The installation is a memorial for the public to visit and remember all those who have died from the COVID-19 pandemic. The artwork is also a tribute to all the healthcare workers and volunteers who have been risking their lives during the crisis. (Photo by Finnbarr Webster/Getty Images)
POOLE, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 27: Luke Jerram's 'In Memoriam' artwork installation on Sandbanks beach on September 27, 2020 in Poole, England. The installation is a memorial for the public to visit and remember all those who have died from the COVID-19 pandemic. The artwork is also a tribute to all the healthcare workers and volunteers who have been risking their lives during the crisis. (Photo by Finnbarr Webster/Getty Images)

He has arranged “Ghost Boats” in a forest to call attention to the effects of climate change and the over fishing of the oceans.

BRISTOL, ENGLAND - APRIL 16: Lights illuminate the cabins of abandoned fishing boats that are part of a new art installation, Withdrawn, which opens to the public tomorrow on April 16, 2015 in Bristol, England. The installation in Leigh Woods is by celebrated artist Luke Jerram and aims to prompt questions about climate change on the marine environment as well as being part of Bristol's years as European Green Capital. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

Born in 1974 the British visual artist resides in the Bristol, England with his wife and children.  He is proud to have created his own “Talking Engagement Ring” when he proposed to the woman who is now his wife.

According to a December 5, 2017 article by Greg Boustead in “Seed” Magazine Jerram discovered that he was colorblind as a child.  And, instead of viewing it as a weakness, he “…construed it as a gift, his own auspicious window into the world.”

It is a gift to be able to share his work.

Visual Artist Luke Jerram Inspires the World

Visual Artist Luke Jerram Inspires the World

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