For the first time in 43 years, the Utica Boilermaker Road Race will not take place on the second Sunday in July.

Race officials announced today that the 2020 Boilermaker has been cancelled due to the coronavirus.

Boilermaker President Mark Donovan says it was a difficult decision to make, but one made with the safety of everyone involved in mind.

"As we have stated from day one, if we could not put on a safe event, we would not proceed,” said Donovan. “That being said, we are thrilled to be able to present the first ever virtual Boilermaker, which will serve as an exciting and unique experience for our participants.

Participants can run on a track or treadmill anytime between September 1st and 13th, then report their time to the Boilermaker via their Runner Sign Up account.

Participants will have shipped to them an historic commemorative pint glass, race bib, finishers medal (15K only) and finishers pin (5K only).

You can still register at boilermaker.com.

If you already signed up, you have until June 30th to choose one of four options – participate in the virtual event, receive a refund, rollover to the 2021 race or donate your registration fee to the Boilermaker.

Expo and Other Boilermaker Weekend Events:

  • Due to safety concerns related to COVID-19, the Boilermaker will not be able to host it’s traditional Expo at MVCC.
  • The Utica National Kids Run will not be conducted in a traditional manner. Work is being done to transition to a potential virtual event as well. Updates will come at a later date.

The 2021 Boilermaker is set to take place on Sunday, July 11th, 2021.

Oneida County Executive Anthony Picente has issued the following statement regarding the Boilermaker:

“The Boilermaker Road Race has been Oneida County’s signature event for more than 40 years and it’s hard to imagine a summer without thousands of people flooding our region from across the globe to participate and celebrate,” said Oneida County Executive Anthony J. Picente Jr. “Unfortunately, the very thing that makes it so special, now poses a threat to the health and safety of our community in light of this pandemic. Not only does its loss deal a blow to the spirit of our community, but it also takes an immense toll on the local economy. I’m glad that it will still carry on in a virtual form, and look forward to the day when it will return as a live event, bigger and better than ever.”

courtesy of the Boilermaker