This spring, New Yorkers may see something odd in their local forest... have you heard of tree girdling?

Every environmental problem has its own unique solution. From the "banded" trees that are fighting invasive insects to the extensive lengths hikers have gone to protect their cars from hungry porcupines, the creativity is endless. Girdled trees, however, are taking things a step further.

Girdling trees is a very important option for conservationists when dealing with invasive species
Girdling trees is a very important option for conservationists when dealing with invasive species (White Memorial Conservation Center via Facebook)
loading...

Girdling Trees in New York State

Girdling is a process that shouldn't be taken lightly, as it will eventually kill the targeted tree. Often used as an option over felling a tree, girdling interrupts the pathway of nutrients between the roots and the branches above. One tree in particular has had a target on its back for this specific process.

Banded trees may look similar to girdling trees, but the process and reasons are different. Banding trees is meant to fight the spongy moth
Banded trees may look similar to girdling trees, but the process and reasons are different. Banding trees is meant to fight the spongy moth (Elkhart County Parks via Facebook)
loading...

Invasive Norway Maple Tree in New York

The Norway maple is an invasive species of maple tree that has spread to nearly half of the United States. Similar to the frustrating (and often illegal) Bradford pear tree, the Norway maple was originally an ornamental tree that has quickly began to cause problems for local ecosystems.

Problems with the Norway Maple tree in New York State

Not only do Norway maples spread quickly, but the shade created by their significant leaf canopy can inhibit the growth of native trees like the white pine (above). If shade reduction is the goal rather than full removal of the tree, girdling can be a helpful option.

96.9 WOUR logo
Get our free mobile app

The Norway maple is not a desired lumber source, so repurposing the trees in other manners is not a helpful option. Conservationists also note that girdling Norway maples instead of removing them completely can be beneficial for wildlife who can use the trunks to make their homes. Speaking of which, check out what happened when a black bear visited SUNY New Paltz below.

Bear on Campus at SUNY New Paltz NY

On Thursday (June 23, 2022) this unassuming good-size black bear wandered onto campus and decided to climb a tree. The SUNY New Paltz Police along with the NYS DEC Police monitored the situation on-site. They were able to encourage the campus visitor to return home without incident.

Gallery Credit: Paty Quyn

Look Inside This Treehouse Airbnb in Upstate New York

Located in Willow, New York this Airbnb inside the trees is worth the trip!

Gallery Credit: Gianna